Posts Tagged ‘trucks’

Rail industry seeks to put the brakes on heavier trucks

triple_trailerThe rail industry is seeking to put the brakes on proposal to increase the amount of weight that trucks can carry in a bid to protect cargo business that typically goes to trains. 

The inter-industry squabble has been spurred by an effort in Congress to increase a current limit of 80,000 pounds for cargo trucks to 91,000 pounds, which is the level being sought by the trucking industry. 

An Alexandria, Va.-based rail industry group known as GoRail said Monday that heavier trucks would be bad for the nation’s roads and environment – in addition to affecting train companies’ bottom lines.

Read more from The Hill.

Americans Do Not Want Bigger Trucks on Highways

triple_trailerConstituents in Illinois, Missouri, Kentucky and eight congressional districts – Pa. Dist. 9, Iowa Dist. 3, Colo. Dist. 4, Kan. Dist. 1, Kan. Dist. 2, Ill. Dist. 13, Ind. Dist. 4 and Mo. Dist. 8 – overwhelmingly disapprove increasing truck weight limits from the current 80,000 pounds to 97,000 pounds. Increasing truck weights range from a low of only 13 percent in Illinois to 19 percent in Colo. Dist. 4 (eastern Colorado). The research data from 5,080 interviews conducted between March 2013 to March 2014 clearly indicate that regardless of where you live, what your political viewpoint may be, or your gender and age, there is a convergence of opinion that heavier trucks are not wanted on U.S. Highways.

View the results of this survey by DFM Research conducted on behalf of the SMART Transportation Division.

Americans do not want bigger trucks on highways

triple_trailerConstituents in Illinois, Missouri, Kentucky and eight congressional districts – Pa. Dist. 9, Iowa Dist. 3, Colo. Dist. 4, Kan. Dist. 1, Kan. Dist.  2, Ill. Dist. 13, Ind. Dist. 4 and Mo. Dist. 8 – overwhelmingly disapprove increasing truck weight limits from the current 80,000 pounds to 97,000 pounds. Increasing truck weights range from a low of only 13 percent in Illinois to 19 percent in Colo. Dist. 4 (eastern Colorado). The research data from 5,080 interviews conducted between March 2013 to March 2014 clearly indicate that regardless of where you live, what your political viewpoint may be, or your gender and age, there is a convergence of opinion that heavier trucks are not wanted on U.S. Highways.

View the results of this survey by DFM Research conducted on behalf of the SMART Transportation Division.

Highway homicide affects railroads, too

triple_trailerThis is about a highway homicide – and we know who dunnit. The perp long ago was identified by state and federal authorities. Yet Congress refuses to order the collar, closing its eyes to a mayhem playing out at every hour, on every federal-aid roadway and adversely affecting every taxpayer and every motorist in the wallet, while simultaneously turning on its head the concept of economic efficiency.

Beyond a shadow of doubt is that heavy trucks pummel pavements and weaken highway bridges, shortening the lives of each while avoiding payment for the damage caused. That’s highway homicide.

 Read the complete story at Railway Age.

Let’s make effort to move more freight by rail

Last month, President Obama announced an initiative to improve the fuel efficiency of trucks. That’s a lofty goal, but here’s an even better idea: Let’s make an effort to move more freight by rail and less by road. Trains are far more energy-efficient than trucks – and they always will be.

Trains have a significant friction advantage over trucks. The degree of “stickiness” between two surfaces is expressed mathematically as the coefficient of friction. For a steel wheel rolling over a steel rail, its value is approximately 0.001. For a rubber tire rolling over pavement, the coefficient is between 0.006 and 0.010, or roughly an order of magnitude greater. Some friction is good – it stops the vehicle when a person runs out in front of it. But too much friction means less energy driving the vehicle forward.

Read the complete story at The Washington Post.

UTU-SMART fights longer, heavier trucks

Click here to see a brochure that was mailed and emailed to all active and retired members in Maine and Wisconsin.

Members in those states, as well as anyone concerned with the preservation of good-paying railroad jobs, should contact Representatives Michaud and Ribble and ask that this legislation be tabled.