Posts Tagged ‘Palmetto GBA’

Palmetto GBA: A reminder on annual wellness visits for retirees

Medicare pays for an Annual Wellness Visit (AWV). It’s an awesome free preventive service that so many Medicare patients have not been taking advantage of. Since the onset of COVID-19, the number of AWVs being performed has fallen drastically, as many people have chosen to put off elective services. However, it’s important for you to do what is best for your health. That also means it may be best to take the time to have this service. If you talk to your healthcare provider and they say that it’s safe for you to have an AWV, then it makes sense to consider doing so.

First off, what is an AWV?

An Annual Wellness Visit is a visit to develop or update a preventive services plan that is personalized to your needs and to perform a Health Risk Assessment (HRA). An AWV comes in two sizes: your initial AWV and your follow-up AWV. Your initial AWV sets the baseline for future visits. Before or during this visit, you will complete a Health Risk Assessment (HRA) questionnaire, which will collect at a minimum:

  1. Your demographic data and a health status self-assessment
  2. Your assessment of depression/life satisfaction, stress, anger, pain, fatigue, isolation or loneliness
  3. Information on behavioral risks, including, but not limited to, if you smoke or use tobacco products, drink alcohol or use drugs, your physical activity and your nutrition
  4. Information on your ability to do general activities of daily living, such as washing clothes, bathing, walking, ability to stand for periods of time, etc.

During an initial AWV, your provider will create a baseline of your medical and family history, capture information about your current list of doctors and medications that you take, and gather measurements of your height, weight, blood pressure and other routine measurements as they apply based on your medical and family history. Your provider may also perform a cognitive impairment assessment to check for Alzheimer’s disease or dementia, and for depression and other mood disorders.

Your healthcare provider will review all of the information you provided to them, along with what they have observed focusing on your ability to do general activities of daily living, your risk of falling, plus any hearing impairments or potential home safety issues that may come up during the visit.

From all of this, your provider will create a written schedule/checklist, for the next five to 10 years for future screening visits and preventive services. Your provider will also give you personalized referrals for health education, preventive programs or counseling services based on what the AWV data has shown them.

These recommended services or programs can help you reduce risk factors or promote wellness, such as increasing weight loss and physical activity, as well as preventing falls and improving your nutrition. Referrals can be made for programs to help you quit smoking. You can also work with your provider to produce Advanced Care Planning documents such as living wills, advanced directives and other documents that instruct others about your healthcare wishes in the event you are unable to do so due to injury or illness.

That’s the first AWV. The second type of AWV is considered a follow-up AWV, or just a plain AWV.

At this AWV visit, you will review and update your HRA and your provider will update your medical/family history, the list of your current providers and medications and your measurements – including weight and blood pressure. Your provider will then make any needed changes to your screening schedule and your personalized health plan, and make new referrals, if necessary, to keep current with your needs. It is important to have this service every year. Your body is constantly changing – every day, every week, every month, every year. You take care of your plants, your car, your family, and you need to remember to take care of yourself as well.

How often can you get an AWV?

You can receive an AWV if:

  • It has been more than 12 months since the effective date of your first Medicare Part B coverage period, and
  • You have not received an Initial Preventive Physical Examination (IPPE, or “Welcome to Medicare” exam ) or an AWV within the past 12 months.

Where can I get an AWV?

Many healthcare providers are authorized to perform AWV services. They include:

  • Doctors of Medicine (MD) or Osteopathy (MO)
  • Physician’s assistant (PA), nurse practitioner (NP), or clinical nurse specialist (CNS)
  • A medical professional (including a health educator, registered dietitian, nutrition professional or other licensed practitioners) or a team of medical professionals working under the direct supervision of a physician.
  • Teaching physicians in graduate medical education programs can perform these services in certain specific circumstances.

If you have a question about the AWV, please call Palmetto GBA’s toll-free Beneficiary Contact Center at 800-833-4455, from 8:30 a.m. until 7 p.m. ET Monday through Friday. They offer a TTY/TDD line at 877-566-3572. This line is for the hearing impaired with the appropriate dial-up service and is available during the same hours as customer service representatives are available. Palmetto’s website is www.PalmettoGBA.com/RR/Me, and offers access to a free self-service internet portal, MyRRMed. MyRRMed offers you access to your healthcare data.

At this time, you can use the portal to access:

  • Status and details of your Railroad Medicare Part B claims;
  • Historical Medicare Summary Notices (MSNs) for your Railroad Medicare Part B claims;
  • A listing of individuals you have authorized to have access to your private health information; and
  • You can also submit a request to add an authorized representative or to edit or remove an existing authorized representative.

To sign up for MyRRMed, visit www.PalmettoGBA.com/MyRRMed.

Palmetto GBA: Details about the coronavirus vaccines

While we are coming up to the one-year anniversary of the coronavirus being present in the United States, we are happy to report that Medicare is taking action with the administration of the coronavirus vaccine across the country.

As the vaccinations roll out, we are receiving questions about the process, and we would like to share them and the answers with you. They are:

What does the vaccine cost?

The vaccine is free. Medicare will pay your provider for administering the vaccine, and you will not be charged in any way. If a provider tries to collect co-pays or any other types of funds specific to the coronavirus vaccine (such as coinsurances or deductibles), please call our office and let us know.

How is the vaccine being distributed?

Every state has its own vaccine distribution plan, and you can access that information from each state’s health department. To find a listing of states and their health departments, their websites and phone numbers, please see the article “What You Don’t Know May Make A Difference” on the Palmetto GBA website at www.PalmettoGBA.com/RR/Me. You can also find a listing on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website at www.CDC.gov.

Where can I find out more about the individual vaccines?

There are two vaccines being used. They are Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine and Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccine​​. Additionally, per the CDC, there are three large-scale (Phase 3) clinical trials in progress or being planned for three COVID-19 vaccines:

AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine

Janssen’s COVID-19 vaccine

Novavax’s COVID-19 vaccine​

As each vaccine is approved and authorized, the CDC publishes information on who should or should not receive that particular vaccine based on health profiles. Additionally, the CDC will publish information to include the vaccine’s ingredients, its safety and its effectiveness. This information is located on the CDC website at www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/different-vaccines.html.

Can I get my shot sooner if I pay for that?

The vaccine is available based on each state’s distribution program. If someone contacts you and tells you that you can pay to either have your name put on a list to receive the vaccine (when you were not on the list yet to receive the shot) or tells you that you can pay to receive the vaccine sooner than you are scheduled for, do not believe them. These “opportunities” do not exist. And as always, do not share your personal and financial information with people who call, text or email you with any offer like this. Keep your private information private. The government will never call you and ask you for money.

If you have a question about Medicare’s coverage of the coronavirus vaccine, please call Palmetto GBA’s Beneficiary Contact Center at 800-833-4455, or for the hearing impaired, call TTY/TDD at 877-566-3572. Customer service representatives are available Monday through Friday, from 8:30 a.m. until 7 p.m. ET.

You are encouraged to visit the Palmetto GBA website at www.PalmettoGBA.com/RR/Me, as well as enrolling to use their free self-service internet portal, MyRRMed. MyRRMed offers you access to your healthcare data. At this time, you can use the portal to access:

  • Status and details of your Railroad Medicare Part B claims
  • Historical Medicare Summary Notices (MSNs) for your Railroad Medicare Part B claims
  • A listing of individuals you have authorized to have access to your private health information.
  • You can also submit a request to add an authorized representative or to edit or remove an existing authorized representative.

To sign up for MyRRMed, please visit the site at www.PalmettoGBA.com/MyRRMed.


Palmetto GBA is the Railroad Specialty Medicare Administrative Contractor (RRB SMAC) and processes Part B claims for Railroad Retirement beneficiaries nationwide. Palmetto GBA is contracted by the independent federal agency Railroad Retirement Board (RRB), which administers comprehensive retirement-survivor and unemployment-sickness benefit programs for railroad workers and their families under the Railroad Retirement and Railroad Unemployment Insurance Acts.

Palmetto GBA: Medicare telehealth coverage expands

Telehealth is a Medicare-approved healthcare service between a provider and a patient via a telecommunication system (such as by phone or video chat). It’s been a covered service for more than a decade, focusing on rural areas where appropriate care may be hard to come by. Patients would be “seen” via a communications medium at a Medicare-approved location (not their homes), and the provider and the facility they were “seen” at would receive payment for the service.

Let’s fast forward to today. The model has changed. As of March 6, 2020, providers can perform “office” visits and other expanded services via telecommunications to a beneficiary at their home. Regulations require that the provider (your doctor, a physician assistant, nurse practitioner, etc.) have an interactive audio and video communications system for use in this service. An “office visit” is another term for a “doctor’s visit;” however, visits completed through telehealth can also include emergency department visits, initial hospital and nursing facility visits and hospice visits. Telehealth services also include psychotherapy, services for substance use disorders, certain physical, occupational and speech-language pathology services and many others.

The expansion to allow for telehealth services in a patient’s home are part of Medicare’s response to the COVID-19 Public Health Emergency (PHE) starting on March 6, 2020. Many Medicare patients are more vulnerable to this disease, based on their medical conditions and age. As such, the expansion of telehealth services makes sense for both the provider and the patient. This has been especially important as many provider offices were closed or were not accepting in-person visits with beneficiaries. Providers are still required to perform the service in a Medicare-approved location, such as a physician’s office, skilled nursing facility or hospital.

Seema Verma, administrator of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and a member of the White House Coronavirus Task Force, said that this expansion of services “represents a seismic shift, initiating a new era of healthcare delivery in America,” per CMS. (To learn more about Administrator Verma’s comments, please visit the CMS website at www.CMS.gov/Newsroom).

If you have a telehealth service, Part B coinsurance and deductible apply. You pay 20% of the Medicare allowed amount after your Part B deductible has been met. These costs are the same as if you had an in-person visit. If you have a preventive or screening service, for which the Part B coinsurance and deductible do not apply, you will pay nothing.

Be sure to watch your quarterly Medicare Summary Notice (MSN) to be sure the charges are correct as many providers are learning how to bill for these services in real-time. If you notice any discrepancies, or you are asked to pay more than you would for an in-person visit, be sure to call Palmetto GBA’s Beneficiary Contact Center at 800-833-4455, Monday through Friday, from 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. ET when customer service representatives are available or visit Palmetto GBA’s website at www.PalmettoGBA.com/RR/Me.

RR Medicare: the transition to new numbers ends December 31

Last July, the Railroad Retirement Board (RRB) mailed approximately 450,000 new Railroad Medicare cards with new Medicare Numbers. The new Medicare Numbers, which are unique to each person with Railroad Medicare and do not contain Social Security Number (SSNs), replace the former Health Insurance Claim Numbers (HICNs). Providers can bill claims to Medicare with either a HICN or a new Medicare Number through December 31, 2019.

At this time, approximately 70% of the Railroad Medicare claims received are submitted with Medicare Numbers. Beginning January 1, 2020, all providers will be required to file claims with Medicare Numbers only.

When it’s time for a doctor’s appointment or other Medicare service, be sure to take your new card with you. Your provider’s office knows everyone should have a new Medicare Number, and they will need to keep a record of your Medicare Number so they can bill Railroad Medicare correctly.

If your provider does not have a copy of your card, they may be able to look up your information with their local Medicare Administrative Contractor (MAC) or with Palmetto GBA Railroad Medicare through our online provider portals. These portals give authorized providers access to claims history, eligibility and more. The portals also contain a tool that allows providers to look up a Medicare Number with the following patient information:

  • Last Name
  • First Name
  • Date of Birth
  • Social Security Number

Please note that in order to use the tool to look up your Medicare Number, a provider must have your Social Security Number. If you do not want to give a provider your SSN, allow them to have a copy of your card or verbally give them your Medicare Number. If you have not used your card yet, you are making it much more difficult for your providers to file claims timely. One of the reasons for having the new cards was to give protection from identity theft. One way to do that is to be very selective when giving your personal information to a trusted entity (your doctor, insurers, etc.).

When verbally giving your Medicare Number to a provider, or to a Customer Service Advocate when you call Railroad Medicare, make sure to read it correctly. Medicare Numbers have 11 characters and contain numbers and uppercase letters only. They do not contain the letters S, L, O, I, B or Z. Characters one, four, seven, 10 and 11 will always be a number. The second, fifth, eighth and ninth characters will always be a letter. The third and sixth characters will be a letter or a number.

Sample RRB Medicare Card:

If you are enrolled in a Medicare Advantage Plan, your new Medicare card does not replace your plan’s identification card. You will continue to use your plan’s ID card to receive your Medicare benefits.

If you did not receive your new Medicare Card with your new Medicare Number, you can call Palmetto’s Beneficiary Contact Center at 800-833-4455 or the Railroad Retirement Board at 877-772-5772.

Have questions?

If you have questions about new Medicare cards or Medicare Numbers, please call Palmetto GBA’s Beneficiary Contact Center at 800-833-4455, Monday through Friday, from 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. ET. You are encouraged to sign up for email updates. To do so, click ‘Listservs’ on the top banner on the Palmetto website at www.PalmettoGBA.com/RR/Me. You are also encouraged to use the beneficiary portal, MyRRMed, which is located at www.PalmettoGBA.com/MyRRMed.

RRB Q&A: Medicare for Railroad Retirement annuitants

The federal Medicare program provides hospital and medical insurance protection for Railroad Retirement annuitants and their families, just as it does for Social Security beneficiaries. Medicare has the following parts:

  • Medicare Part A (hospital insurance) helps pay for inpatient care in hospitals and skilled nursing facilities (following a hospital stay), some home health care services and hospice care. Part A is financed through payroll taxes paid by employees and employers.
  • Medicare Part B (medical insurance) helps pay for medically-necessary services like doctors’ services and outpatient care. Part B also helps cover some preventive services. Part B is financed by premiums paid by participants and by federal general revenue funds.
  • Medicare Part C (Medicare Advantage Plans) is another way to get Medicare benefits. It combines Part A, Part B, and sometimes, Part D (prescription drug) coverage. Medicare Advantage Plans are managed by private insurance companies approved by Medicare.
  • Medicare Part D (Medicare prescription drug coverage) offers voluntary insurance coverage for prescription drugs through Medicare prescription drug plans and other health plan options.

The following questions and answers provide basic information on Medicare eligibility and coverage, as well as other information on the Medicare program.

1. Who is eligible for Medicare?

All Railroad Retirement beneficiaries age 65 or over and other persons who are directly or potentially eligible for Railroad Retirement benefits are covered by the program. Although the age requirements for some unreduced Railroad Retirement benefits have risen just like the Social Security requirements, beneficiaries are still eligible for Medicare at age 65.

Coverage before age 65 is available for disabled employee annuitants who have been entitled to monthly benefits based on total disability for at least 24 months and have a disability insured status under Social Security law. There is no 24-month waiting period for those who have ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.

If entitled to monthly benefits based on an occupational disability, and the individual has been granted a disability freeze, he or she is eligible for Medicare starting with the 30th month after the freeze date or, if later, the 25th month after he or she became entitled to monthly benefits. If receiving benefits due to occupational disability and the person has not been granted a disability freeze, he or she is generally eligible for Medicare at age 65. (The standards for a disability freeze determination follow Social Security law and are comparable to the medical criteria a person must meet to be granted a total disability.)

Under certain conditions, spouses, divorced spouses, surviving divorced spouses, widow(er)s, or a dependent parent may be eligible for Medicare hospital insurance based on an employee’s work record when the spouse, etc., turns 65. Also, disabled widow(er)s under 65, disabled surviving divorced spouses under 65, and disabled children may be eligible for Medicare, usually after a 24-month waiting period.

Medicare coverage at any age on the basis of permanent kidney failure requiring hemodialysis or receipt of a kidney transplant is also available to employee annuitants, employees who have not retired but meet certain minimum service requirements, spouses and dependent children. The Social Security Administration has jurisdiction over Medicare in these cases. Therefore, a Social Security office should be contacted for information on coverage for kidney disease.

2. How do persons enroll in Medicare?

If a retired employee or a family member is receiving a Railroad Retirement annuity, enrollment for both Medicare Part A and Part B is generally automatic and coverage begins when the person reaches age 65. For beneficiaries who are totally disabled, both Medicare Part A and Part B start automatically with the 30th month after the beneficiary became disabled or, if later, the 25th month after the beneficiary became entitled to monthly benefits. Even though enrollment is automatic, an individual may decline Part B; this does not prevent him or her from applying for Part B at a later date. However, premiums may be higher if enrollment is delayed. (See question five for more information on delayed enrollment.)

If an individual is eligible for, but not receiving an annuity, he or she should contact the nearest Railroad Retirement Board (RRB) office before attaining age 65 and apply for both Part A and Part B. (This does not mean that the individual must retire, if working.) The best time to apply is during the three months before the month in which the individual reaches age 65. He or she will then have both Part A and Part B protection beginning with the month age 65 is reached. If the individual does not enroll for Part B in the three months before attaining age 65, he or she can enroll in the month age 65 is reached, or during the three months that follow, but there will be a delay of 1 to 3 months before Part B is effective. Individuals who do not enroll during this “initial enrollment period” may sign up in any “general enrollment period” (January 1 – March 31 each year). Coverage for such individuals begins July 1 of the year of enrollment.

3. Are there costs associated with Medicare Part A (hospital insurance)?

Yes. While individuals don’t have to pay a premium to receive Medicare Part A, recipients of Part A benefits are billed by the hospital for a deductible amount ($1,364 in 2019), as well as any coinsurance amount due and any noncovered services. The remainder of the bill from the hospital, as well as bills for services in skilled nursing facilities or home health visits, is sent to Medicare to pay its share.

4. What are the costs associated with Medicare Part B (medical insurance)?

Anyone eligible for Medicare hospital insurance (Part A) can enroll in Medicare medical insurance (Part B) by paying a monthly premium. The standard premium is $135.50 in 2019. However, some Medicare beneficiaries will not pay this amount because of a provision in the law that states Part B premiums for current enrollees cannot increase by more than the amount of the cost-of-living increase for Social Security (Railroad Retirement Tier I) benefits. Since that adjustment was 2.8 percent for 2019, about 2 million Medicare beneficiaries saw an increase in their Part B premiums, but still pay less than $135.50. The standard premium amount applies to new enrollees in the program, and certain beneficiaries who pay higher premiums based on their modified adjusted gross income.

Monthly premiums for some beneficiaries are greater, depending on a beneficiary’s or married couple’s modified adjusted gross income. The income-related Part B premiums for 2019 are $189.60, $270.90, $352.20, $433.40, or $460.50, depending on how much a beneficiary’s modified adjusted gross income exceeds $85,000 ($170,000 for a married couple), with the highest premium rates only paid by beneficiaries whose modified adjusted gross incomes are over $500,000 ($750,000 for a married couple).

There is also an annual deductible ($185 in 2019) for Part B services.

Palmetto GBA, a subsidiary of Blue Cross and Blue Shield, generally processes claims for Part B benefits filed on behalf of Railroad Retirement beneficiaries in the Original Medicare Plan (the traditional fee-for-service Medicare plan). An individual in the Original Medicare Plan should have his or her hospital, doctor, or other health care provider submit Part B claims directly to:

Palmetto GBA
Railroad Medicare Part B Office
P.O. Box 10066
Augusta, GA 30999-0001
1-800-833-4455
www.palmettogba.com/medicare

Persons with questions about Part B claims under the Original Medicare Plan can contact Palmetto GBA as noted above.

5. Can Medicare Part B premiums increase for delayed enrollment?

Yes. Premiums for Part B are increased 10% for each 12-month period the individual could have been, but was not, enrolled. However, individuals age 65 or older who wait to enroll in Part B because they have group health plan coverage based on their own or their spouse’s current employment may not have to pay higher premiums because they may be eligible for “special enrollment periods.” The same special enrollment period rules apply to disabled individuals, except that the group health insurance may be based on the current employment of the individual, his or her spouse or a family member.

Individuals deciding when to enroll in Medicare Part B must consider how this will affect eligibility for health insurance policies which supplement Medicare coverage. These include “Medigap” insurance and prescription drug coverage and are explained in the answers to questions six through eight.

6. What is Medigap insurance?

Many private insurance companies sell insurance, known as “Medigap,” that helps pay for services not covered by the Original Medicare Plan. Policies may cover deductibles, coinsurance, copayments, health care outside the United States and more. Generally, individuals need Medicare Part A and Part B to enroll, and a monthly premium is charged. When someone first enrolls in Medicare Part B at age 65 or older, he or she has a one-time 6-month “Medigap open enrollment period.” During this period, an insurance company cannot deny coverage, place conditions on a policy, or charge more for a policy because of past or present health problems.

7. Do Medicare beneficiaries have choices available for receiving health care services?

Yes. Under the Original Medicare Plan, the fee-for-service Medicare plan that is available nationwide, a beneficiary can see any doctor or provider who accepts Medicare from qualified Railroad Retirement beneficiaries and is accepting new Medicare patients. Those enrolled in the Original Medicare Plan who want prescription drug coverage must join a Medicare prescription drug plan as described in question eight.

However, a beneficiary may opt to choose a Medicare Advantage Plan (Part C) instead. These plans are managed by Medicare-approved private insurance companies. Medicare Advantage Plans combine Medicare Part A and Part B coverage, and are available in most areas of the country. An individual must have Medicare Part A and Part B to join a Medicare Advantage Plan, and must live in the plan’s service area. Medicare Advantage Plan choices include regional preferred provider organizations (PPOs), health maintenance organizations (HMOs), private fee-for-service plans and others. A PPO is a plan under which a beneficiary uses doctors, hospitals and providers belonging to a network; beneficiaries can use doctors, hospitals and providers outside the network for an additional cost. Under a Medicare Advantage Plan, a beneficiary may pay lower copayments and receive extra benefits. Most plans also include Medicare prescription drug coverage (Part D).

8. How does Medicare Part D (Medicare prescription drug coverage) work?

Medicare contracts with private companies to offer beneficiaries voluntary prescription drug coverage through a variety of options, with different covered prescriptions and different costs. Beneficiaries pay a monthly premium (averaging about $33 in 2019), a yearly deductible (up to $415 in 2019) and part of the cost of prescriptions. Those with limited income and resources may qualify for help in paying some prescription drug costs.

The Affordable Care Act requires some Part D beneficiaries to also pay a monthly adjustment amount, depending on a beneficiary’s or married couple’s modified adjusted gross income. The Part D income-related monthly adjustment amounts in 2019 are $12.40, $31.90, $51.40, $70.90, or $77.40, depending on the extent to which an individual beneficiary’s modified adjusted gross income exceeds $85,000 ($170,000 for a married couple), with the highest amounts only paid by beneficiaries whose incomes are over $500,000 ($750,000 for a married couple).

To enroll, individuals must have Medicare Part A and live in the prescription drug benefit plan’s service area. Beneficiaries can join during the period that starts three months before the month their Medicare coverage starts and ends three months after that month. There may be a higher premium if an individual does not join a Medicare drug plan when first eligible. A beneficiary can generally join or change plans once each year during an enrollment period from October 15 through December 7. Drug coverage would then begin January 1 of the following year. In most cases, there is no automatic enrollment to get a Medicare prescription drug plan. Individuals enrolled in Medicare Advantage Plans will generally get their prescription drug coverage through their plan.

9. Where can I get more information about the Medicare program?

General information on Medicare coverage for Railroad Retirement beneficiaries is available on the RRB’s website, RRB.gov, under the Benefits tab (Medicare) or by contacting an RRB field office toll-free at 1-877-772-5772.

More detailed information on Medicare’s benefits, costs, and health care options are available from the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) publication Medicare & You, which is mailed to Medicare beneficiary households each fall and to new Medicare beneficiaries when they become eligible for coverage. Medicare & You and other publications are also available by visiting Medicare’s website, Medicare.gov, or by calling the Medicare toll-free number, 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227).

How Medicare responds to hurricane-related disasters

When a natural disaster, extreme weather or other emergency occurs that affects providers and the Medicare beneficiaries that they serve, special emergency-related policies and procedures may be implemented.

The process begins when a governor of an affected state requests assistance. This is done if the event is beyond the combined response abilities of the state and local governments. From this request, the President of the United States can declare a Public Health Emergency (PHE), using the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act.

Under Section 1135 or 1812(f) of the Social Security Act, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) can issue ‘blanket waivers’ for providers and suppliers when it comes to services that are provided by skilled nursing facilities, home health agencies and critical access hospitals. Measures are in place to assist with durable medical equipment and supplies, as well as quality reporting, extending the appeals time limit, and getting replacement prescription refills.

As an example in an impacted area, when a waiver is granted for submitting appeal requests (which normally would need to be filed 120 days from the date of the claim denial notification), an appeal may be filed after the 120 days based on CMS guidance.

The following are the most recent hurricane-related PHE’s for which HHS has authorized waivers:

2018 Waivers

  • Hurricane Michael – Florida (at the time of writing this article)
  • Hurricane Florence – North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia

2017 Waivers

  • Hurricane Maria – Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands
  • Hurricane Nate – Louisiana and Mississippi
  • Hurricane Irma – Florida, Georgia and South Carolina
  • Hurricane Harvey – Texas and Louisiana

Medicare has a toll-free helpline you can use if you are in an impacted area. This Disaster Distress Helpline is available 24/7. The toll-free, multilingual and confidential crisis support service can be reached by calling 1-800-985-5990. You can also text TalkWithUs to 66746 (for Spanish, press 2 or text Hablanos to 66746) to connect with a trained crisis counselor.

More information is available to you at the following address: https://www.hhs.gov/about/news/2018/10/09/hhs-secretary-azar-declares-public-health-emergency-florida-due-hurricane-michael.html

Hurricanes don’t discriminate in terms of destruction, and there are times when a person only has the clothes on their back – but no wallet or Medicare card to get assistance. If you lose your Medicare card, you can call our Beneficiary Customer Service Center at 800-833-4455, Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. until 7 p.m. ET to order a new one. For the hearing impaired, call TTY/TDD at 877-566-3572. You may also call the Railroad Retirement Board at 877-772-5772.

You are encouraged you to visit Palmetto GBA’s Facebook page at www.Facebook.com/MyRRMedicare, as well as their website at www.PalmettoGBA.com/RR/Me for more information.

“Patients Over Paperwork:” Medicare is reviewing regulations to reduce provider burden

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is reviewing regulations that mandate how doctors and other practitioners document the services they provide. The focus is on the following:

  • Reducing unnecessary burden
  • Increasing process efficiencies
  • Improving the patient’s experience with their provider

CMS is beginning this process with evaluation and management services (office or outpatient visits). The goal is to increase the time providers spend with their patients and decrease the time spent documenting services. At the same time, CMS consistently seeks to reduce provider errors and unnecessary appeals.

CMS Administrator Seema Verma explained: “…we are moving the agency to focus on patients first. To do this, one of our top priorities is to ease the regulatory burden that is destroying the doctor-patient relationship. We want doctors to be able to deliver the best quality care to their patients.”

To see more information about the Patients Over Paperwork initiative, please visit the CMS website at https://www.cms.gov/About-CMS/story-page/patients-over-paperwork.html.

If you have questions about your Railroad Medicare coverage, you may call Palmetto GBA’s Beneficiary Contact Center at 800-833-4455, or for the hearing-impaired, call TTY/TDD at 877-566-3572. Customer service representatives are available Monday through Friday, from 8:30 a.m. until 7 p.m. ET. Visit Palmetto’s Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/myrrmedicare/.

Visit Palmetto GBA’s free online beneficiary portal at www.PalmettoGBA.com/MyRRMed. This tool offers you the ability to access Railroad Medicare Part B claims data, historical Part B Medicare Summary Notices (MSN), and a listing of individuals you have authorized to have access to your personal health information.

Medicare introduces new claim review process

Medicare is always working to fight fraud and abuse. With that, a new type of claim review has recently begun: a process called Targeted Probe and Educate, or ‘TPE’ for short.

How TPE works:

Palmetto GBA/Railroad Medicare will conduct data analysis and find providers whose billing may be very different from their peers. Palmetto will also look at providers who have been identified as having a high error rate (having filed claims that should not be paid, due to medical necessity issues, billing or coding errors, or ones that do not have sufficient documentation to support the service was rendered as billed).

Once a provider is identified, Palmetto will request records for 20 to 40 services, depending on how much the provider has billed to Railroad Medicare.

After the claims are reviewed, one of Palmetto’s clinical staff members will contact the provider by letter and by phone to go over their results and offer education on how to bill and document their services correctly. If the provider has a high error rate in the review, then Palmetto will ask for records for an additional 20-40 claims submitted for payment and follow the process outlined above. If the provider fails to improve again, then a last round of TPE is conducted. If the provider’s error rate is still unacceptable, they will be referred to Palmetto’s Benefit Integrity Unit for investigation. The same is true for providers who refuse to respond to the records requests.

However, if the provider makes an appropriate improvement, they can be removed from the TPE process for a period of time, and then rechecked later to be sure they are still in compliance.

If your provider has questions:

Your provider may have questions about this review process. If they do, please ask them to call our Provider Contact Center at 888-355-9165 and select Option 5. Customer Service Representatives can assist them in understanding the TPE process. All Medicare contractors are using the TPE process to review claims.

If you have any questions about your Railroad Medicare coverage, please call Palmetto’s Beneficiary Contact Center at 800-833-4455, Monday through Friday, from 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. ET. For the hearing impaired, call TTY/TDD at 877-566-3572. This line is for the hearing impaired with the appropriate dial-up service and is available during the same hours customer service representatives are available.

Palmetto also invites you to join their listserv/email updates. Just select the ‘Listservs’ link at the top of their main webpage at www.PalmettoGBA.com/RR/Me.

Retirees: Palmetto GBA introduces beneficiary portal

Palmetto GBA has introduced a new beneficiary portal, MyRRMed, where users will have access to claims data, historical Medicare Summary Notices and data on who they have authorized to have access to their private health information.

Portal Functions:

At this time, you can use the portal to access:

  • Status and details of your last 22 Railroad Medicare claims on file
  • Historical Medicare Summary Notices (MSNs)

You also can view a list of individuals with whom you have authorized Railroad Medicare to grant access to your healthcare information.

Creating an Account:

Accessing MyRRMed information is easy. Just click here to follow the link and enter the following information:

  • Your Medicare number (as printed on your Medicare card)
  • Your last name
  • Your first name
  • Your date of birth
  • The effective date for Part B (as printed on your Medicare card)

Once you have entered this information and it is verified within our files, you will create a user name and password.

Logging Into the Portal:

To enhance the security of Medicare data, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid services (CMS) requires Palmetto GBA to adhere to several security requirements. Some of these security features require the user to verify their identity using their email address.

This is done through what’s called ‘Multi-Factor Authentication’, or ‘MFA’. MFA has the user log partially in, and then the system sends a ‘passcode’ (a unique and random set of numbers) to either your telephone by text or your email for you to enter on the portal access page. Upon each log in, users are required to enter an MFA code in addition to their password to access MyRRMed. CMS requires that Medicare contractors use MFA as a secondary level of security to protect beneficiary data.

When is the Portal Available?

MyRRMed is generally available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. However, certain functions are only available from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time (ET). These include accessing claims data and MSNs.

Questions?

If you have questions about using the tool, please call Palmetto’s Beneficiary Contact Center at 800-833-4455, or for the hearing-impaired, call TTY/TDD at 877-566-3572. Customer Service Representatives are available Monday through Friday, from 8:30 a.m. until 7 p.m. EST.

Medicare open enrollment: now thru Dec. 7

Beginning Oct. 15 and running through Dec. 7, 2017, the open enrollment period allows Medicare-eligible patients the option of changing their coverage for 2018. Your 2018 Medicare & You Handbook should have arrived via the postal mail, and it’s important that you read this guide as you are making your decision. Every year, open enrollment is the chance to decide if you want to keep your current plan, or change to a Medicare Advantage Plan, or other health plans. If you were eligible for but not enrolled in Medicare Part B last year, you can sign up for coverage with Original Medicare or a Medicare Advantage Plan. Open enrollment is also the time to sign up for or change your prescription drug coverage, if you need to.

While the Part B premium and deductible have not yet been published, Part B (which includes Railroad Medicare) works as the following:

  • You pay a Part B premium each month (most people will pay a standard amount).
  • You may pay more if your adjusted gross income on your income tax return from two years ago is above a certain level.
  • For most services, you have a 20 percent copay.

If you need help determining the best plan for you, we encourage you to contact your State Health Insurance Program, also called ‘SHIP’. SHIP is available in all 50 states and U.S. territories. It may be called something slightly different in your state (California’s SHIP is called the ‘California Health Insurance Counseling & Advocacy Program’ (HICAP)). However, they function the same way. You can find the contact information for the SHIP in your state by visiting Palmetto GBA’s website at www.PalmettoGBA.com/RR/Me/SHIP.

If you have questions about SHIP, you can call Palmetto’s toll-free Beneficiary Customer Service Line at 800-833-4455, Monday through Friday, from 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. EST. For the hearing impaired, call TTY/TDD at 877-566-3572. This line is for the hearing impaired with the appropriate dial-up service and is available during the same hours customer service representatives are available.

Palmetto GBA invites you to join their listserv/email updates. Just select the ‘listservs’ link at the top of their main webpage at www.PalmettoGBA.com/RR/Me.

Medicare Part B premium costs for 2016

Palmetto_rgb_webThe Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has released the 2016 Part B premium and deductible costs for 2016. Railroad Medicare processes claims for Part B services. 

The 2016 monthly premiums will remain unchanged for approximately 70 percent of Medicare beneficiaries. However, the remaining 30 percent will pay a different amount based on the following criteria:

  • those enrolling for the first time in 2016
  • individuals not receiving Railroad Retirement/Social Security benefits
  • those who are directly billed for their Part B premiums
  • those who have Medicare and Medicaid and Medicaid pays the premiums, or
  • individuals whose modified gross incomes from two years ago is above a certain threshold

For beneficiaries who meet one of those criteria, Part B premiums for 2016 will be based on their annual income in 2014.

Those filing individual tax returns with annual incomes (in 2014) noted here will pay the following in 2016:

  • less than or equal to $85,000 will pay $121.80 in 2016
  • greater than $85,000 and less than or equal to $107,000 will pay $170.50
  • greater than $107,000 and less than or equal to $160,000 will pay $243.60
  • greater than $160,000 and less than or equal to $214,000 will pay $316.70
  • greater than $214,000 will pay $389.80

Those filing joint tax returns with annual incomes (in 2014) noted here will pay the following in 2016:

  • less than or equal to $170,000 will pay $121.80  
  • greater $170,000 and less than or equal to $214,000 will pay $170.50
  • greater than $214,000 and less than or equal to $320,000 will pay $243.60
  • greater than $320,000 and less than or equal to $428,000 will pay $316.70
  • greater than $428,000 will pay $389.80

The rates are slightly different for married beneficiaries who lived with their spouse (at any time during the year) and file separate tax returns. Those filing separate tax returns with annual incomes (in 2014) noted here will pay the following in 2016:

  • Less than or equal to $85,000 will pay $121.80
  • Greater than $85,000 and less than or equal to $129,000 will pay $316.70
  • Greater than $129,000 will pay $389.80.

The Medicare Part B deductible will be increasing from $147 per year in 2015 to $166 per year in 2016. 

If you have questions about your Part B Premium, you can call the Railroad Retirement Board toll free at 877-772-5772 or for the hearing impaired (TTY) call 312-751-4701. General information can also be found at the RRB’s website at www.rrb.gov.

If you have questions about your Railroad Medicare coverage, you can call the Beneficiary Contact Center at 800-833-4455, or for the hearing impaired, call TTY/TDD at 877-566-3572. Customer Service Representatives are available Monday through Friday, from 8:30 a.m. until 7 p.m. ET.

Palmetto GBA: when a doctor’s notes are not readable

Palmetto_rgb_webWe all know the joke: if you have poor penmanship, you should become a doctor. 

Unfortunately, poor penmanship on patient notes and records can lead to claim denials, because if Medicare can’t read what the doctor wrote, we can’t know if the services were reasonable and necessary and meet all guidelines for coverage.

Medicare requires that the patient’s medical record be complete and legible, and it should include the readable identity of the provider and the date of service. With the inception of electronic records (the likely reason your doctor is now toting around a laptop computer), issues such as this are declining. However, they still present a problem when a claim is subjected to medical review.

What a doctor can do about this issue (if they have illegible handwriting):

  1. Have notes transcribed and then electronically signed by the doctor, when necessary
  2. Add amendments/corrections and delayed entries (only when needed) into medical documentation in the following way:
    •     Clearly and permanently identify the changes or corrections
    •     Clearly indicate the date and author of these changes or corrections
    •     Do not delete the original content in the record
  3. Provide an acceptable handwritten signature that meets Medicare guidelines.  These guidelines allow Medicare to look at the records and consider a ‘signature log’ or ‘attestation statement’ that identifies the author of the record, and there are specific ways a doctor who signs their name in a ‘scribble’ can meet the signature requirements.  These specific ways are identified on the CMS website, as well as the Palmetto GBA website for providers. If your doctor needs to know more about these methods, we encourage them to call our Provider Contact Center at 888-355-9165.

What you can do about the issue:

  1. If a claim denies due to illegible records, and your Medicare Summary Notice (MSN) indicates that you owe $0.00, do not pay your doctor for the service. If your doctor insists that you pay for a service in this situation (when the MSN says you don’t owe anything), call our Beneficiary Contact Center at 800-833-4455.
  2. If a claim denies and your MSN shows that you owe $0.00, it is not necessary to file an appeal. You can still file an appeal because it is your right to do so; however, you are not required when you are not liable.

If you have any questions about your Railroad Medicare coverage, please call our Beneficiary Contact Center at 800-833-4455, Monday through Friday, from 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. ET. We encourage you to sign up for email updates. To do so, click ‘E-Mail Updates’ on the top of our beneficiary website at www.PalmettoGBA.com/rr/me  to start the process. 

We also encourage you to visit our Facebook page at www.Facebook.com/MyRRMedicare.